Atopy- Allergic Inhalant Dermatits

My dog is biting and chewing and smells like a dirty tennis shoe! What is going on? The short answer is allergies. Instead of getting itchy, runny eyes, a runny nose and sneezing like we get with allergies, your dog will develop other signs.

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These signs will vary with the season and what your dog is allergic to. However, pets that are allergic to house dust mites, food, or other indoor allergens can have trouble year round.

We can diagnose what your pet is allergic to with a blood test that checks both inhalant and food allergens. This will help you with avoidance which is the first step in treatment. Allergy testing will also enable you to desensitize your pet with allergy serum injections or oral medicine.

Other treatments include antihistamines, fatty acid supplements, medicated shampoos, steroids, Apoquel, and Cytopoint. So, if your pet is itching, licking, and smells like an old tennis shoe, give us a call and we will help!

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“Dental Disease Is More Than Bad Breath”

As veterinary dental month comes to a close, the focus of our pet’s dental health should not decline. Dental disease is more than bad breath and tartar on the teeth and can have a great impact on your pet’s overall health.

Periodontal disease is the most common clinical illness our adult pets face. Periodontal disease is the infection and inflammation of the structures that support the tooth within the jaw. Periodontal disease begins with the formation of tartar on the teeth, as the tartar gets under the gum line the damage to the tooth structure begins. Some of the early signs include bad breath, gingivitis (redness of the gum) and bleeding of the gums. If left untreated periodontal disease can lead to loose and painful teeth, tooth root abscess, or osteomyelitis (infection of the bone).

Periodontal disease can be difficult for pet parents to recognize in the early stages. Early signs may include bad breath and possibly loose teeth. Since our pets can’t tell us when a tooth hurts only a thorough oral exam can diagnose early stages of periodontal disease. Your veterinarian should examine your dog’s teeth during their annual examination. In addition, your veterinarian may recommend a thorough oral exam under general anesthesia including cleaning all of the teeth and taking dental x-rays to allow for the early detection and treatment of periodontal disease.

Most human dentists recommend that you have your teeth cleaned and examined twice a year and have dental x-rays completed once a year, and we brush our teeth twice a day! So the next time you visit your veterinarian ask about your pet’s dental health and what can be done to keep your pet’s teeth healthy and pain-free.

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 Resource:  American Veterinary Dental College

By: Dr. Andy Mack